This yam is poisonous. It is most often found growing near freshwater streams in low coastal country, in particular coastal monsoon vine thickets. The plant has one central stem or trunk and an umbrella of dark green leaves radiating from the top. All the leaves are deeply split or divided. The central stem grows from a large underground tuber.

Even though the yam is poisonous, Aboriginal people found a way to eat the yam after extensive treatment. This would involve slicing the tuber, then washing it in a running stream for no less than two days, after which . . .

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